Review: 11 Reasons To NOT Seek Shelter From ‘The Wild Storm’ #2

"You're father named you Cole Cash. We're all trying to meet that bar for wit"

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Aliens on Earth. Black Ops and Intel. Scientific experiments on people. Hybridization. Secret power structures, and tons of badassery…On an alternate Earth, all these elements will come together in a bold new interpretation of now classic concepts and characters from the old Wildstorm Universe. Welcome to new ‘The Wild Storm’!

The Wild Storm #2 The Wild Strom #2
Written by
: Warren Ellis
Art by:
Jon Davis-Hunt & Steven Buccellato

Published by: DC Comics

The second issue of The Wild Storm does not disappoint. It continues the excellent set-up, pacing, and narrative drive that was planted in the first issue. It’s also spectacularly beautiful to look at. So far this has all the ingredients of the best of Warren Ellis’ past work. Check out 11 things that make The Wild Storm #2 a must read comic book this week.The Wild Storm #2

  1. The rapid clip, razor sharp pacing.
  2. Using the very real Montauk, NY Camp Hero as a plot point/location.
  3. “What’s in Montauk? State Parks. Fishing. A lighthouse. Something called Rufus Wainwright.”
  4. The clean, crisp, and delicate line work of Jon Davis-Hunt and Steven Bucellato.
  5. The coloring by Ivan Plascencia that enhances the art instead of over-powering it.
  6. “You know why the Kremlin never gets hacked? Because Putin has an army of typists and a room full of paper maps”
  7. The long, dialogue-free moments that carry the narrative forward.
  8. Grifter and Voodoo
  9. The panel on page 16 with Zealot’s reflection on the glass.
  10. The subtle call backs to the old Wildstorm Universe.
  11. The sheer confidence and attitude that embraces so many high-concepts and makes them believable.

The Wild Storm #2So there you have it guys, this is so far a very solid, must read new series. And word has it there is more to come from this world/universe. It is the smart way to bring back old concepts and make them feel new. Not a rebirth, but a reinterpretation.